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RemovedApr 6, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby
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Apr 7, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

DEI is an even more unfortunate, and revealing, acronym choice than DIE. It puts one in mind of divinity - which I suspect is why they prefer it, because it is the idol they worship.

Personally, I quite like IED, because that's the functional effect of this ideological regime on our institutions.

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RemovedApr 7, 2023Liked by Lorenzo Warby
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Excellent and useful essay. That is going into links to be used in future.

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"IED"

Titter.

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Apr 6, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

Excellent, Lorenzo.

May I make a suggestion? You're very good at explaining the mechanics that are often invisible to people. In my view, this is the most important thing a public writer or thinker does, and not enough do it.

Pieces like this would be even better with a concrete (even if made up or hypothetical) example. For instance, a fully written out piece of "congenial bullshit" where the nugget of truth is clearly identified, and the superfluous bullshit that accretes around it is specifically pointed out.

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Apr 6, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

I was going to suggest something similar which also might add to the article; make for a funny read, break up the heavy social-science bits.

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Excellent point. Now I am no longer travelling/working/being exhausted I will definitely do so in my companion post to this essay on my substack and keep the point in mind in future essays.

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Apr 6, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

This is an insightful essay which could be of great value in assessing the reliability of expert opinon. Beware of political or bureaucratic opinion based on expertise in a matter for which truth is a weak social signal. If that opinion comes from a politician or some other person who stands to profit directly, then presume the opinon is wrong.

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"It is hard to imagine a more stupid or more dangerous way of making decisions than by putting those decisions in the hands of people who pay no price for being wrong." -- Thomas Sowell

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Jul 5, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

Sowell always says it just right!

I hate that he is withdrawing from the battle.

There are so few George Pattons.

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He is an older gent, and may wish to enjoy what's left of his retirement!

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Likely so, at 93.

That we say farewell matters. Why does not.

The enormous loss of Sowell is all the larger, as we pray daily that Biden (at a mere 80 ) leave his day job and, for the love of God, leave us alone. Sowell descrying what's wrong, analyzing why and advising what to do exits the arena to enjoy his life. The nation's Ratso Rizo hangs on to a life of ruining life.

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Apr 6, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

Congenial bullshit is a magnificent phrase! I wouldn't be surprised if it were cited by future historians as the hallmark of this era.

Glad to have discovered your writing. Your insight, depth and originality are appreciated.

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Ta!

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Apr 6, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

I bought Harry Frankfurter’s book years ago.

Lies and bullshit kill people. I don’t know what we can do if we can’t follow the bullshit back to punish the source.

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Apr 7, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

Wouldn't it be lovely if we could haul all the writers and pundits into a public forum and require them to explain why they lied, distorted, gaslite during the pandemic. People died because they believed masks, distancing, staying home and vaccination might protect society. Anybody who spoke the truth was shouted down and cancelled. Group thinkers in the NIH directly opposed science and scientists who had data proving official proclamations wrong. The harm to society was high yet none accountable.

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The systematic errors of pandemic public policy were both striking and horrifying. We would literally have done better to flip a coin: we could expect to be right around half the time, rather than as systematically wrong as policy was. This will be the subject of analysis in later essays, including one specifically on pandemic policy failures.

The combination of pravda-model media, bureaucratic incentives and self-deception need to be clearly and publicly analysed.

https://helendale.substack.com/p/the-pravda-media-model

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Apr 10, 2023Liked by Lorenzo Warby

Quite correct. Event 201 cued up the TNI in advance. Sadly Event 201 centered around a pathogen that was much more dangerous then SARs-2 turned out to be. Not sure why nearly all media and officials refused to deal with the 1000X age vulnerabilities. Using some average IFR given the age differences was really bad science.

I see a confluence of factors arriving to create a bad response. Reading Dr Atlas's book, I could sense his huge frustration. But he could not move Trump who was preoccupied with other factors. Once the pandemic became political, all hope was lost.

The world group-think still amazes me but points to other weak leaders not willing to face any of that TNI effort. All level headed debate was crushed and fear dominated.

I'll look forward to your assessment of how and why we did so poorly. Even now those who benefited by bad policy are asserting another pandemic is looming. They have tasted great power and want more of that.

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Ta. Just checking, by TNI you mean this TNI?

https://www.tni.org/en

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Apr 10, 2023Liked by Lorenzo Warby

TNI - Trusted News Initiative founded under the BBC. See https://childrenshealthdefense.org/legal_justice/trusted-news-initiative-antitrust-litigation/. See https://www.bbc.com/mediacentre/2020/trusted-news-initiative-vaccine-disinformation where "The Trusted News Initiative (TNI) was set up last year to protect audiences and users from disinformation, particularly around moments of jeopardy, such as elections.". Notice "set up last year", actually related to Event 201 planning. As if elections were a matter of real concern. Ok, Russia, Russia except the election misinformation is usually from various partisans who spend real money to influence low information people.

OTOH, the TNI was set up in July 2019 (https://www.globalresearch.ca/who-behind-trusted-news-initiative/5790640) but Event 201 was in Oct, 2019. There were earlier planning events. But back in 2017 Fauci was working for a solution to Zika, etc https://web.archive.org/web/20180723060934/https://www.niaid.nih.gov/news-events/multiple-research-approaches-are-key-pandemic-preparedness-niaid-officials-say.

Trust in media https://www.theburningplatform.com/2022/08/19/who-is-behind-the-trusted-news-initiative/

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Orwellian is supposed to be a warning, not a how-to manual. But, for so many folk, it is the latter.

I want to close every single University Media/Communications department/faculty. Any media class that identifies with/as elite will betray the citizenry and, despite stratospheric self-deception, universities train folk to so identify.

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Apr 6, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

Your point about reality tests is very well made. Reality provides some constraint for me in my research because I am a commercial law academic, and there are a vast number of practising lawyers and real decisions. That being said, it depends what you are looking for. If I come up with a very elegant theory and well expressed theory which bears little relation to actual case law and legislation, I may well be cited by other academics admiring of my theory, particularly if I have a group of admirers. Practitioners, however, will not find my work useful. I like to be useful: I want my work to be of service to the public. Also, I have never really liked grand theories. So hence my own path was set.

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Apr 7, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

Will no one rid me of these turbulent midwits?

In all seriousness, they are a plague on the land. Their malign influence is a stronger argument against electoral democracy than the knuckle-dragging illiterates the midwits so love to mock.

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Apr 7, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

Amazing article, one of your best yet. You very succinctly boiled down game theory, consequences, and examples of this incredibly prevalent phenomenon. "incentives matter"

I can't help but think of this in the context of the many "scientific" journals that exist in a nearly 100% theoretical realm which effectively become factories of self deception and manipulation for personal aggrandizement.

You pulled out the DEI context here, but I think of the media at large are a clear example of this now that journalistic standards are not in vogue. Constantly referring to reality testing the public can't do themselves, or delaying the adoption of the "test results" and shifting the goalposts on what to expect until there are few social consequences for having been wrong all along. Whether it's the Taibbi described "bombholes", or the more recent silent edits and gaslighting.

In any case, fantastic.

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Apr 7, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

Interesting that someone like Will Storr, who teaches how to see through BS, unquestioningly accepts certain "truths" as received wisdom. I guess he has his own social status to maintain.

"It seemed obvious that the pandemic would all but wipe out ardent anti-vaxxers – who’d turn down a jab during a global plague?" https://www.telegraph.co.uk/health-fitness/mind/power-solitude-alone-doesnt-mean-lonely/

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A lot of folks were taken in, for good faith reasons. Some have since recanted, as the evidence mounted: John Campbell and Aseem Malhorta being prominent examples of this.

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Being unwilling to ask hard questions (also for the questioner) does not strike me as good faith. It strikes me as being a "Good German".

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If they later publicly change their minds, we should give them credit for that. The willingness to do so is to be encouraged, after all.

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Apr 7, 2023·edited Apr 7, 2023Author

Just a short note to say that Lorenzo will respond to people's comments - however, it's a bank holiday in Australia (Good Friday) and he has just come off a month's very intense work that's included a lot of travel & working weekends.

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Apr 7, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

Can't wait for an exposition of "evolutionary novelty of abandoning presumptive sex roles and the accompanying feminisation of institutions and social mores." As we watch the birth rate decline among the "best and brightest" who will create the next technology wave?

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Apr 9, 2023Liked by Helen Dale, Lorenzo Warby

This is fantastic. I see this in a few facebook groups which end up being just peuedo intellectual bullshit. What you capture highlights much of what underpins what I wrote about in 'You Know Nothing.' which is the mainfestation of this foundation.

https://polymathicbeing.substack.com/p/you-know-nothing

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Ta. Regarding that fine essay of yours, you may find this paper of useful relevance.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/17456916221148147

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Nov 25, 2023Liked by Lorenzo Warby

“If the costs of error are low, then the efficient level of self-deception, the level of self-deception that enables us to be more persuasive and more able to moralise and rationalise our self-interest, is going to be high.”

I suggest a small change: “If the costs of error are low or if the costs are borne by people other than those whom we are trying to persuade,…” Luxury beliefs are luxuries only if someone else is taking out the trash, keeping the lights on, and paying the tab.

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Nice point.

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