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Seeing the crisis of the third century as a Eurasia wide event is interesting. Do you have any links to articles/blog posts etc explaining that perspective?

Also how in detail did the collapse in silver lead to more beaurocratisation? One way would be that they had to evolve a more paper-based financial system along with whatever government regulation that required. But I sense you are not talking about that, rather you are talking about an imperial beaurocracy overseeing food-rents.

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It is a case of putting things together. So, there is Raoul McLaughlin’s work on the revenue and trade flows of the Roman Empire. https://raoul-mclaughlin.com/.

Also, Walter Scheidel and colleagues work on Han China and Rome.

https://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2009/2009.04.66/

But the original analysis on the importance of trade for the size of states is from David Friedman. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/24107762_A_Theory_of_the_Size_and_Shape_of_Nations

If you add into his analysis the capacity of state’s to increase taxable trade by providing public goods, you have what you need to put it together.

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Not merely food rents, but far more taxation in kind generally. Paper-based financial systems require paper (not yet available in Rome) and really printing (not yet available anywhere). If you want to see how silver-stressed the Roman monetary system had become, see here.

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Fineness_of_early_Roman_Imperial_silver_coins.png

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On the matter of the Muscovite state being a Christian farming polity that adopted some institutional patterns from pastoralist states, the use of the pastoralist Cossacks as bodyguards, shock troops and order-enforcers increases the congruence.

https://www.youtube.com/live/lcRBh9sJfVM?si=K2HF7SPpsD3PO1Hm

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